CCSD Employees Learn to “Stop the Bleed”

CCSD Employees Learn to “Stop the Bleed”

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Category : CCSD

A brief video about this event can be viewed on our YouTube channel here: http://bit.ly/2J07WRo

Paramedic demonstrates direct pressure wound care to teachers.

CCSD Preschool Centers Principal Vicky Thom, left, listens as paramedic Reginald Thurmon explains how to pack gauze into a wound to stop severe bleeding.

More than 300 CCSD teachers, administrators and support staff underwent “Stop the Bleed” training on Wednesday, May 30, to learn how to apply direct pressure and tourniquets to assist victims in the event of an emergency situation. The training, facilitated by Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services, also provides a dozen “Stop the Bleed” emergency kits for each school, containing tourniquets, gauze and other medical supplies needed to stem severe bleeding. All CCSD schools participated in the training, which was held at 18 school sites across the county.

firefighter displays supplies in a kit

Cherokee County Fire & ES instructor Bryan Thomas explains the contents of a Stop the Bleed kit. Each school received 12 kits to be placed throughout their facility as part of the training.

 

The day began with a “train the trainer” session at Cherokee High School, where school nurses worked with Fire ES instructors, staff from Northside Hospital Cherokee and other medical professionals from the community to receive their training, led by Sgt. Nate Sullivan with Fire & ES. Then the nurses and Fire & ES instructors trained teachers, administrators and support staff out at school sites in the afternoon. The training consists of both a presentation and hands-on instruction.

 

 

nurse instructs teachers on how to apply direct pressure to a wound

Teasley MS nurse Kathy Thomas, left, assists Teasely MS Principal Dr. Ben Lester, right, as he practices filling an open “wound” with gauze. Assistant Principals John Carter and Liz Spell look on.

 

“Everyone I interacted with from the school system was enthusiastic, receptive, and accommodating. It was great to see how stakeholders from the community came together to achieve such an important goal,” said Sgt. Sullivan. “We essentially taught 18 ‘Stop The Bleed’ classes for over 320 school staff, simultaneously, and completed the entire school system in one day. Everyone involved did a stellar job.”

 

“We appreciate the assistance from Cherokee Fire and Emergency Services in helping train hundreds of teachers, administrators and support staff across our schools yesterday,” said Dr. Brian V. Hightower, Superintendent of Schools. “While we certainly hope none of our staff members will have to use these skills in an actual emergency, we are committed to being proactive and being prepared to help save lives.”

firefighter teaches a class

CCSD school nurses listen as instructor Sgt. Nate Sullivan with the Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services agency explains the Stop the Bleed program.

 

CCSD Lead Nurse Gwen Chambers said the school nurses were very receptive to the training and partnering with the county fire department to deliver it to schools. “School Nurses are proud to be a resource to school staff for training such as ‘Stop The Bleed,’” said Ms. Chambers. “The kits and additional skills to utilize the kits will supplement existing safety and security plans for students and staff.”

one teacher ties a tourniquet on another

Ralph Bunche Center’s Connie Gonyea practices using a tourniquet on co-worker Anne Marie Corley.

 

Cherokee County Fire Chief Tim Prather noted that Sgt. Sullivan’s initiative in bringing the program to Cherokee County, along with the school district’s readiness to participate, has created a safer community for everyone.

 

“A huge ‘thank you’ from the Cherokee County Fire Chief’s office to the Cherokee County School System for your partnership, acceptance and participation in the program,” said Chief Prather.   “As we come to work each day, we do not know what will be thrown at us in public safety. Now, we have not only increased the awareness, but we have personnel trained in every schoolhouse in Cherokee County that may make the difference in a victim being a survivor or fatality.”

 

Georgia launched the nationwide “Stop the Bleed” campaign in 2017, that puts knowledge gained by first responders and military into the hands of the public to help save lives by stopping uncontrolled bleeding in emergency situations.

If bleeding is severe, it can kill within minutes, potentially before trained responders can arrive. Research has shown that bystanders, with little or no medical training, can become heroic lifesavers. Similar to the use of CPR or automatic defibrillators (AED), improving public awareness about how to stop severe bleeding can be the difference between life and death for an injured person. Currently the campaign has been funded to train and equip all Georgia Public Schools with bleeding control kits.

For more information, see the website at http://georgiatraumafoundation.org/stopthebleed/