Report: No CCSD Schools Reach ‘Critically Overcrowded’ Levels

Report: No CCSD Schools Reach ‘Critically Overcrowded’ Levels

The 2016-17 Cherokee County Inventory of School Housing shows the impact of returning enrollment growth and indicates several areas where additional classroom space will soon be needed.

Additionally, 2016-17 marks the fourth consecutive year during which none of the School District’s schools are considered “critically overcrowded,” reflecting long-standing successful management practices and School Board policies governing student enrollment growth forecasts and school construction project planning.

The below chart uses this school year’s 20-day enrollment count (Aug. 25, 2016) to measure the percentage of overcrowding. School Board Policy defines “critically overcrowded” as when a school exceeds 140% of its enrollment capacity and meets other criteria, including use of all existing portable classrooms. Pursuant to the School Board’s Critical Overcrowding Policy (FDBD), the impact of actual student enrollment is evaluated annually after the 20th day of classes, which is when attendance traditionally peaks, to determine critically overcrowded schools and what, if any, action is needed.

The effort to eliminate “critical overcrowding” in the School District began in 2001, with an aggressive, multi-tiered Education Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (Ed SPLOST) plan proposed by a Blue Ribbon Committee of community leaders and approved by the School Board for inclusion on a local ballot referendum.  This plan to “bond” future sales tax revenue, which has been extended twice by voters over the past decade, continues today with new construction and renovations, strategic land purchases, replacement school buses and emerging technologies for students and staff.

Unfortunately, if portable classrooms were not available, 11 schools would be operating at 100% or more of their capacity.  It should be remembered that, while portable classrooms provide relief for classroom instruction, they do not alleviate overcrowding in media centers, cafeterias, restrooms and hallways. The schools are: Free Home ES, Liberty ES, Woodstock ES, Creekland MS, E.T. Booth MS, Mill Creek MS, Woodstock MS, Cherokee HS, Creekview HS, Sequoyah HS and Woodstock HS.  Of those 11 schools, five are operating at more than 120% capacity… a decrease from seven reaching that level last school year: Free Home ES – 126%, Creekland MS – 126%, Woodstock MS – 121%, Cherokee HS – 133% and Sequoyah HS – 137%.

Staff continues to analyze this new data to determine recommendations that may be needed to address overcrowding in preparation for the next school year(s).  Data is compiled and analyzed year-round to monitor not only enrollment growth, but also the local real estate market, development trends, local birth rates and other demographics … in order to best determine when and where new and/or replacement school facilities are needed.

Relief has been provided to Dean Rusk Middle School, which had one of the highest levels of overcrowding in the School District last year.  With its opening this month, the School District gained capacity at that location, and also at its four elementary feeder schools — Hickory Flat ES, Holly Springs ES STEM Academy, Indian Knoll ES and Mountain Road ES — as the sixth-grade students from those facilities now attend Dean Rusk MS in its new Grades 6 – 8 grade configuration.  Additionally, Sequoyah HS will add classroom capacity as it gains the original Dean Rusk MS facility into its footprint later this school year!

Again, it should be noted that all new and replacement school construction and renovations in the School District are funded by Education SPLOST revenue.  Voters will again have the opportunity to authorize the School District to continue its capital outlay plans, as the School Board has called for a renewal of the Ed SPLOST in November.

2016-17 CCISH Chart

The 2016-17 Cherokee County Inventory of School Housing shows the impact of returning enrollment growth and indicates several areas where additional classroom space will soon be needed.


CCSD Earns Highest-Ever Scores on ACT

Snapshot: CCSD 2016 ACT and SAT Results

The Class of 2016 earned the Cherokee County School District’s highest-ever scores on the challenging ACT college entrance and placement examination, continuing to rank the system in the top five in the State and topping the National average.

The CCSD average ACT composite/total score on the curriculum-based test is 23.1, rising from 22.7 last year and from 20.8 over the past decade; the State average increased to 21.1 and the National average declined slightly to 20.8.  Students earn a score on a scale of 1 to 36; the ACT is taken in lieu of or along with the SAT.

The CCSD Class of 2016 earned the system’s highest-ever scores in the English (22.8), Reading (23.9) and Science (22.9) sections, with averages for those three areas increasing from the previous year, and Math holding steady at 22.1 – all of these subject scores exceed State and National averages.  The number of CCSD seniors who took the ACT also soared to 1,623 – 62% of the senior class – a jump from 1,450 and 59% the previous year.

ACT 2016 Chart

CCSD 2016 ACT Results Chart

CCSD Principals will evaluate these results with leadership and data-management teams to determine instructional areas to target for improvement.  Counselors will review these scores to ensure the best testing choices are recommended to students for college admission and scholarship success.  The ACT will be administered in CCSD this year on Sept. 10, Oct. 22, Dec. 10, Feb. 11, April 8 and June 10.

“We firmly believe that our students and teachers are not numbers, and that a successful education cannot be defined only by achieving high test scores,” Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower said.  “Results such as these ACT scores do provide a useful benchmark for a wider evaluation of teaching and learning… and we are very proud that our students and teachers continue to excel at such an impressive level!”

“We appreciate all of the effort it takes to succeed at this height: dedicated students and supportive families working together with our CCSD team of teachers at every grade level, support staff, administrators, volunteers and partners, and a community that has supported investing in education through renewal of our Education SPLOST,” he added.

Another benchmark that goes hand-in-hand with these results is the State data that shows when CCSD students enter college, they are more prepared than their peers: 90 percent of recent CCSD graduates who enrolled in a state college or university (9,100 students) did not need a single remedial class.

“We remain focused on the progress of every student and ‘Educating the Emerging Generation’ for the next step in their lives, whichever path they choose!” Dr. Hightower said.

 


School Board Student Delegate Accepted into U.S. Coast Guard Academy

A River Ridge High School senior has received early acceptance into the U.S. Coast Guard Academy!

Jordan Mason, who represents his high school as a Student Delegate to the Cherokee County School Board, is one of only 35 students nationwide to receive the full commissioning this early.

Ranked among the most elite undergraduate colleges in the U.S., the Academy’s highly selective admission process annually identifies only the top 300 candidates from a nationwide pool.

“Needless to say, we are extremely proud of our Senior Class President and School Board representative,” River Ridge HS Counselor Jeff Bennett said.

MASON Jordan

Jordan Mason

Jordan also has earned the Superintendent’s Key Scholar Award, Presidential Community Service Award and Physical Fitness and Health Award and is a two-year Varsity Track student athlete.

A member of the National Honor Society, Knights of the Round Table and Beta Club, Jordan has been selected for leadership programs including Teen Leadership Cherokee Class of 2015, Model Metro Atlanta Regional Commission and the Chick-fil-a Leadership Program.

He has served as a youth soccer referee and volunteers as coordinator for the school’s Big/Little mentorship program and through the Crusading Knights Service Club.


Bascomb Elementary School Wins National Grant to Install Playground Sun Shade

Tags : | | |

Category : CCSD

Bascomb ES Shade 2 8 22 16

Bascomb ES PTA recently applied for and won an $8,000 2016 Shade Structure Program Grant from the American Academy of Dermatology to install a permanent shade structure over the back playground.

Bascomb Elementary School is home to a new playground sun shade thanks to a National grant!

 

The school’s PTA applied for and won an $8,000 2016 Shade Structure Program Grant from the American Academy of Dermatology… and was one of only 19 winners nationwide.

 

The school recently held a ribbon cutting to celebrate the installation of the permanent shade structure over the back playground.  The ceremony was attended by school and PTA leaders including Georgia PTA President Lisa-Marie Haygood; Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower and Cherokee County School Board Chair Kyla Cromer and Board Member Rick Steiner.

Bascomb ES Shade 3 8 22 16

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower speaks during the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Atlanta North Dermatology dermatologist Dr. Jihyun “Ellen” Koo, a member of the Academy, sponsored the grant application and participated in the ceremony.  Bascomb ES is only the second school in Georgia to win the grant since the Academy began awarding it in 2000.

 

“Without this grant, which will cover more than half the cost, this project would not have been possible, ” Bascomb ES PTA immediate Past President Heather Shaw said. “We are extremely thankful to the American Academy of Dermatology, and Dr. Koo, for their help and generosity.”

 

The Shade Structure Grant Program is part of the Academy’s SPOT Skin Cancer campaign (www.SpotSkinCancer.org) to reduce the incidence of skin cancer by educating the public about effective skin cancer prevention tips.

Bascomb ES Shade 1 8 22 16

Celebrating the ribbon cutting for Bascomb Elementary School’s new permanent shade structure are, from left to right, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower, School Board Chair Kyla Cromer, Atlanta North Dermatology dermatologist Dr. Ellen Koo, PTA grant writer Amanda Weber, Principal Kathleen Chandler, Georgia PTA President Lisa-Marie Haygood and School Board Member Rick Steiner.


Board Briefs: Board Hears Positive Report on CCSD Finances

2016-17 Student Advisor and Student Delegates

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower welcomes the 2016-17 Student Advisor and Student Delegates to the Cherokee County School Board at the Aug. 11, 2016 School Board Meeting. From left to right, front row: Meghan Hines, Etowah HS; Kayla Brader, Woodstock HS; Parker Quarles, Creekview HS; second row: Julia Kochansky of Cherokee HS; Jordan Mason of River Ridge HS; Isabelle Riddle of Sequoyah HS; back row: Student Advisory Joseph Henderson of ACE Academy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cherokee County School Board on Thursday, August 11, 2016, devoted its strategic work session to an update on the financial state of the Cherokee County School District, and the Board heard very good news.

The School District has received a “clean opinion” on its most recent financial audit, with no findings, which means that the finances and accounting all are in proper order and following best practices. The State also has issued its letter of acceptance, which closes the process.

The School District’s overall financial position continues to improve as the county recovers from the recession, with local property tax collections expected to exceed projections by approximately $3.5 Million, which will increase reserves. Intentionally increasing the reserves “savings account” is one way that CCSD is strategically improving its credit rating from the already positive Aa2 and AA levels, as rated by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, to the top AAA rating.

“We’re in much better shape than we have been,” Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower said, noting he and his staff are meeting with county government leaders to discuss possibly adjusting the tax collection timeline to further improve CCSD’s financial position as it relates to the timing of the annual infusion of local tax dollars into the operating budget.

The School Board then reviewed more detailed plans for the five-year renovation plan to begin if the Education SPLOST (Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) renewal is approved by voters in November. The renewal of the penny sales tax is focused on: retiring bond debt from school construction; building new classrooms and learning spaces at three schools; continuing to fulfill technology infrastructure and instructional needs; acquiring land for future school construction; purchasing 35 replacement school buses; and major renovation projects at more than two dozen schools.

In addition to reviewing a detailed list of those renovation projects, the School Board heard plans to install artificial turf in all of CCSD’s high school stadiums, which will save $1.6 Million in grass field maintenance costs over the lifetime of the turf… about $110,867 in savings a year that could instead be spent on teaching and learning in CCSD classrooms.

The installation of artificial turf, which already has been completed in other metro school systems such as Cobb, Forsyth and Fulton counties, offers other benefits in addition to the savings, such as fewer injuries to students, faster recovery time after rain and increased usage opportunities by multiple athletic teams and marching bands for both games and practices.

If the Education SPLOST is approved in November, the turf installation would likely take place the summer of 2018; while Etowah HS already has turf that was installed by its school foundation, it would receive a needed resurfacing as part of the project. Additionally, new restrooms would be installed at the Etowah HS and Sequoyah HS stadiums to replacing outdated facilities.

School Board Member Clark Menard said he appreciates the thought put into developing the Education SPLOST plans.

“Paying down the debt and increasing our bond rating will have a direct impact on being able to meet our financial obligations,” Mr. Menard said, adding he sees the value in projects like the turf installation that reduce maintenance and operating costs. “It’s not sexy. It’s not a great big high school. But it provides some real return for our operating fund.”

The School Board also heard another installment in a series of staff presentations on the negative impact the Governor’s Opportunity School District Constitutional Amendment, which will be on the ballot in November, would have on CCSD if approved by voters.

The Amendment would allow the State to take over so-called “failing schools” and turn operations of the schools and their assets paid for with local monies over to for-profit private operators overseen by an appointed statewide czar — despite the fact that the metric (CCRPI) used to issue this label is based on a faulty barometer of achievement.

“How can the State seriously consider overriding local control of a community school based upon a metric that changes each year,” Dr. Hightower said. “They’re using a metric that’s seriously flawed, and this is as high-stakes as it gets.”

School Board Members spoke up in agreement with Dr. Hightower’s concerns; and at the Sept. 1 meeting, the Board likely will consider adopting a resolution opposing the Constitutional Amendment.

“This really bothers me,” School Board Chair Kyla Cromer said of the potential for State takeover of local schools. “Our schools are working their tails off… the students are working, the teachers are working, the parents are working.”

School Board Member Mike Chapman said it’s a smack in the face to anyone who supports local control of their community schools, but the ballot language is deceptive.

“The language is all motherhood and apple pie, unicorns and rainbows,” he said. “It’s crazy what’s going on here and counter to everything we talk about [as conservatives].”

During its regular meeting, the School Board also:

• Recognized Georgia PTA Outstanding School PTAs and Award Winners;

• Recognized Johnston ES as a National Common Sense Digital Citizenship Certified School and Media Specialist Angel Ginn as a National Common Sense Digital Citizenship Certified Educator;

• Recognized CCSD Technology Project Specialist Sandi Adams as a National Microsoft Innovator Educator Expert Award winner;

• Recognized Creekland Middle School’s Sixth-Grade Academic Bowl Team for Nationals win;

• Recognized the 2016-17 Student Advisor to School Board, Joseph Henderson of ACE Academy, and Student Delegates;

• Approved renewal of Partnership Agreements with Cherokee County Council of PTA and Cherokee County YMCA;

• Approved the first reading of technical modifications to School Board Policies;

• Approved monthly Education SPLOST report;

• Approved out-of-state travel;

• Approved out-of-state and overnight student field trips;

• Approved the monthly capital outlay projects report;

• Approved special lease agreements;

• Approved monthly personnel recommendations; and,

• Began planning for required annual School Board Member training.

Next School Board meeting: 7 p.m. Sept. 1, 2016


CCSD Teacher Wins International Entrepreneurship Education Award

Category : CCSD

International Entrepreneurship Award Kari Palmer 8 11 16

Sequoyah High School marketing teacher Kari Palmer was honored at this summer’s 29th Annual International Entrepreneurship Institute with the Dr. Paul DeLargy Angel Award.

A Cherokee County School District teacher has won a top award from an international entrepreneurship education program!

 

Sequoyah High School marketing teacher Kari Palmer was honored at this summer’s 29th Annual International Entrepreneurship Institute with the Dr. Paul DeLargy Angel Award.

 

The award is the highest honor the Institute bestows and “recognizes the educator who develops entrepreneurship education best practices along with implementation plans that have the greatest potential for social impact and student transformation.”  The recipient also must “exhibit passion for student transformation and capture the very spirit of a social entrepreneurship angel.”

 

Ms. Palmer, with CCSD Special Education teacher Linda VanFossen, developed a plan to increase high school graduation rates by involving more Career Technical Instruction (CTI) students in entrepreneurship career classes and by offering more experiential learning activities.  CTI is a program that supports Special Education students enrolled in Career, Technical and Agricultural Education classes.

 

Only one high school teacher receives this annual award, which is named for Dr. Paul DeLargy, founder of Real LEDGE (Leading Economic Development through Global Entrepreneurship), in honor of his dedication to transforming student lives through entrepreneurship.  Dr. DeLargy, according to the Institute, “believes that educators who use experiential best practices to serve, teach and inspire their students are the greatest social entrepreneurs, or as he more lovingly calls them, social entrepreneurship angels.”

 

The Institute is presented by Real LEDGE in partnership with the Kennesaw State University Entrepreneurship Center to prepare K-12 and post-secondary educators and community-based organizations to teach entrepreneurship.  Ms. Palmer was one of four CCSD educators to attend the Institute.


CCSD Announces 2016-17 High School Fall Athletics Events Schedule

Tags : | |

Category : CCSD

SHS volleyball

Love to watch a good game and cheer on the team?

The Cherokee County School District 2016-17 High School Fall Athletics Events schedule now is available online here.

Times and dates are subject to change due to inclement weather.


CCSD Names 2016-17 Student Advisor, Student Delegates to School Board

The Cherokee County School District has named the 2016-17 Student Advisor and Student Delegates to the School Board.

 

The School Board has included a Student Advisor position on its board since 1999, and for the past six years, a Student Delegate from each high school also has been selected. These students serve for one year to give input and feedback to the School Board; the advisor role is rotated among the county’s high schools.

 

This year’s Student Advisor is Joseph Henderson of ACE Academy. The Student Delegates are: of Cherokee High School, Julia Kochansky; of Creekview High School, Parker Quarles; of Etowah High School, Meghan Hines; of River Ridge High School, Jordan Mason; of Sequoyah High School, Isabelle Riddle; and of Woodstock High School, Kayla Brader.

 

The students will begin their service at the School Board meeting on August 11.

 

Students selected to serve as Student Advisor or Student Delegates share common traits: they excel in the classroom, often ranking in the top 10 percent of their class and earning titles like valedictorian; they are involved in their school, often participating in numerous clubs, sports and organizations; and they seek out opportunities to serve and lead.

BRADER Kayla HENDERSON Jospeh HINES Meghan KOCHANSKY Julia MASON Jordan QUARLES Parker RIDDLE Isabelle

STUDENT ADVISOR

ACE Academy, Joseph Henderson

  • Recipient of: Algebra Excellence Award
  • Member of: ACE Academy Student Council, Boy Scouts of America – Troop 241 (Life Scout, Order of the Arrow) and Flag Honor Guard
  • Volunteers for: Special Olympics, Etowah River Clean-Up Project, Georgia National Cemetery (flag and wreath placements)

 

STUDENT DELEGATES

Cherokee HS, Julia Kochansky

  • Recipient of: Superintendent’s Key Scholar Award, Honor Roll, Georgia Scholar, Optimist Club Essay Contest – First Place, National Latin Exam – Gold (Latin I, II, and III), Spirit of Learning Award, Academic Excellence Certificate, Academic Letter, Lamp of Knowledge, Georgia Certificate of Merit, Governor’s Honors Program Nominee, Student of the Month, National AP Scholar, AP Scholar with Distinction, GHSA State Literary Competition Essay Writing – First Place Divisional, Hugh O’Brien Youth Leadership Conference and Leadership 56, Mock Trial Lawyer Award, Daughters of the American Revolution Youth Citizenship Award
  • Member of: National Honor Society, Alpha Gamma, Beta Club, Mock Trial, Leadership 56 (Sophomore and Junior Year)
  • Volunteers for: Fernbank Museum Future Urban Naturalist Program

 

Creekview HS, Parker Quarles

  • Recipient of: Academic Letter, Scholar Athlete, Superintendent’s Key Scholar Award, UGA Certificate of Merit, AP Scholar and All-County Lacrosse
  • Member of: National Honor Society, Habitat for Humanity, Beta Club, Student Government, DECA and FBLA
  • Volunteers for: Summer lacrosse coach

 

Etowah HS, Meghan Hines

  • Recipient of: Academic Letter, Superintendent’s Key Scholar Award, SGA Student of the Month and National Spanish Exam Bronze Award
  • Member of: Student Government (Student Body President, Senior Class President, Junior Class President, Sophomore Class Treasurer and Freshman Class Secretary) Beta Club, Mu Alpha Theta, Nation English Honor Society, National Honor Society, Flight Club and Competitive Dance
  • Volunteers for: Church mission trips and ministry, Shop with an Eagle, SGA Elementary Reading Program

 

River Ridge HS, Jordan Mason

  • Recipient of: Superintendent’s Key Scholar Award, Presidential Community Service Award and Physical Fitness and Health Award
  • Member of: National Honor Society, Teen Leadership Cherokee Class of 2015, Student Government (2017 Vice President), Knights of the Round Table, Beta Club, Metro Atlanta Regional Commission and Chick-fil-a Leadership Program
  • Volunteers for: Big/Little High School Mentorship Program Coordinator and Crusading Knights Service Club

 

Sequoyah HS, Isabelle Riddle

  • Recipient of: AP Scholar with Distinction, PSAT Academic Achievement Award, Academic Letter, Ayn Rand Institute Essay Contest – Second Place, Quest Bridge College Prep Scholar, One National Dance Competition – Second Place Overall, Teen Leadership Cherokee Most Outstanding Leader Award, Grant Recipient for “Doggie Dash” Service Project and PTA Reflections Contest State Winner
  • Member of: National Honor Society President, Student Government (Treasurer), Beta Club (Honorary Member), Fellowship of Christian Athletes Leadership Council, Model Atlanta Regional Commission
  • Volunteers for: H.F.D.A Gives Back (service club founder) and MUST Ministries (Summer Lunch Coordinator)

 

Woodstock HS, Kayla Brader

  • Recipient of: Academic Letter, Gold Medal, National Spanish Exam – Silver Medal and Certificate, WHS PTSA Essay Scholarship 2015-16 Winner, Governor’s Honors Program Nominee and Varsity Letter in Track
  • Member of: Wolverine Marching Band, National Honors Society, Science National Honor Society, Beta Club, Model United Nations, Women in Science and Engineering (President), Spanish National Honors Society (Past President) and Youth Community Board at Transfiguration Catholic Church
  • Volunteers for: Domestic violence shelter and Transfiguration Catholic Church

 


Schools to Host Curriculum Night Events

Category : CCSD

CCSD’s Curriculum Night events provide parents with an overview of what their child will be learning during the 2016-17 school year.

This event is orchestrated through each of the local schools/Innovation Zones, but the tentative scheduling is as follows:

Elementary School: Fourth Week of School (Week of 8/22)

Middle School: Fifth Week of School (Week of 8/29)

High School: Sixth Week of School (Week of 9/6)

Additional Use: Seventh Week of School (Week of 9/12)

 

Elementary Schools Date(s) Grade Level(s) Time(s)
Arnold Mill ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Avery ES August 23 Kindergarten, 2nd, 4th 6:30 p.m.
  August 24 1st, 3rd, 5th 6:30 p.m.
Ball Ground ES August 25 All grade levels 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Bascomb ES August 22 2nd 6:00 p.m.
  August 22 5th 7:00 p.m.
  August 23 1st 6:00 p.m.
  August 23 4th 7:00 p.m.
  August 25 Kindergarten 6:00 p.m.
  August 25 3rd 7:00 p.m.
Boston ES August 22 4th, 5th 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 2nd, 3rd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 25 Kindergarten, 1st 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Canton ES August 18 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00 p.m.
  August 23 Kindergarten 5:30 p.m.
  August 23 1st 6:45 p.m.
  August 25 2nd 5:30 p.m.
Carmel ES August 23 All grade levels 5:00-5:45 p.m.

6:30-7:15 p.m.

Clark Creek ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:00-7:30 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Clayton ES August 23 All grade levels 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Free Home ES August 25 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
Hasty ES August 25 All grade levels 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Hickory Flat ES August 23 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:30 p.m.
  August 25 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:30 p.m.
Holly Springs ES August 25 All grade levels 5:00-5:45 p.m.

5:45-6:30 p.m.

6:30-7:15 p.m.

Indian Knoll ES July 26 Kindergarten 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 22 1st, 3rd, 4th 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 2nd 5th 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Johnston ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Knox ES July 27 Kindergarten 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 16 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00 p.m.
  August 18 1st, 2nd 6:00 p.m.
Liberty ES August 16 1st 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 18 Kindergarten 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 23 2nd 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 23 3rd 7:00-8:00 p.m.
  August 25 4th 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 25 AIM 6:30-7:00 p.m.
  August 25 5th 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Little River ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st 2nd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00-7:00 p.m.

 

Macedonia ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 5:45 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 5:45 p.m.
Mountain Road ES August 23 All grade levels 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Oak Grove ES August 22 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:00 p.m.
  August 23 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00 p.m.
R.M. Moore ES August 25 All grade levels 6:00 p.m.
Sixes ES August 22 Kindergarten 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 22 2nd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 22 4th 6:30-7:30 p.m.
  August 23 1st 5:30-6:30 p.m.
  August 23 3rd 6:00-7:00 p.m.
  August 23 5th 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Woodstock ES August 23 Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd 6:00-8:00 p.m.
  August 25 3rd, 4th, 5th 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Middle Schools Date(s) Grade Level(s) Time(s)
Creekland MS August 16 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
Dean Rusk MS August 30 All grade levels 6:15-8:30 p.m.
E.T. Booth MS August 30 6th 6:30 p.m.
  September 1 7th, 8th 6:30 p.m.
Freedom MS August 30 All grade levels 6:00 p.m.
Mill Creek MS August 29 6th 6:30 p.m.
  August 30 7th 6:30 p.m.
  September 1 8th 6:30 p.m.
Teasley MS August 29 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
Woodstock MS August 30 6th, 7th, 8th 6:00-8:00 p.m.
High Schools Date(s) Grade Level(s) Time(s)
Cherokee HS September 6 All grade levels 6:00-8:00 p.m.
Creekview HS September 6 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
Etowah HS September 6 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
River Ridge HS September 12 All grade levels 6:30 p.m.
Sequoyah HS September 6 All grade levels 7:00 p.m.
Woodstock HS September 6 All grade levels 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Educational Centers Date(s) Grade Level(s) Time(s)
ACE Academy August 23 All grade levels 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Johnston Preschool August 23 Preschool 6:00-7:00 p.m.
L.R. Tippens Education Center September 8 All grade levels 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Oak Grove Preschool August 23 Preschool 6:00-7:00 p.m.
Polaris Evening Program September 7 All grade levels 7:00-8:00 p.m.
Ralph Bunche Center August 22 Preschool 6:00-7:00 p.m.

 

 


CCSD’s 2016 Varsity Football Season Kicks Off Aug. 12

Category : CCSD

football photo for website

Are you ready for some football?

Here’s a complete listing of Cherokee County School District 2016 High School Varsity Football Games: CCSD 2016 Varsity Football Schedule .

Mark your calendar so you can cheer on our outstanding student-athletes!

Times and dates are subject to change due to inclement weather.